Monday, 15 September 2014

From Micro-Chips to Oven-Chips...

Lo, and it came to pass, that a micro-chip was created that could cure all life's ills! Well, not quite, but it seems that as a counter-blast to low fat oven-chips, scientists have their eyes on providing us with the ‘magic-bullet’ to tackle the big beast of potential money-makers - obesity. You see, it’s all to do with our hormones and not those irresistible itsy-witsy fast-food offers that are thrust down our throats at every turn that we just simply can’t resist. 


Obesity is one of the greatest burdens on the NHS increasing the risk of conditions including diabetes, some cancers, heart, liver and kidney disease, gallstones and reduced fertility. The National Obesity Forum says that a quarter of adults are now considered obese and that, based on current trends, this could exceed one in every two by 2050. About 12,000 hospital appointments every year are for obesity-related conditions, the group says.

Behind the much fabled micro-chip is Professor Steve Bloom, who has combined the disciplines of physics, psychiatry and chemistry to tackle what he describes as the greatest killer of the modern day. His career has been focused on gut hormones and the discovery that the oxyntomodulin hormone reduces appetite and could offer a potential new treatment for obesity, This led to the creation of his company Thiakis, which was sold to the US pharmaceutical company Wyeth in 2008 for $150 million! Wyeth has significant ongoing research in metabolic diseases and is a ‘leader in the development and commercialisation of biotechnology-based drugs.’


As well as your gastric band, your weight-watchers, your faddy diet, packets of pills and mindfulness, we’re now on the brink of having, ‘an "intelligent microchip", which can send signals to the brain to stop the urge to eat.’

So, bugger the guilt and purchase your implant and I’m sure there’ll be shed-loads of data gathered from your inner recesses that might be sold-on to other sales teams. Who knows, if all else fails, google-glass might come up with a canny way of making us see ourselves as the perfect svelte creatures we’re told we should be, whilst harvesting shed loads of your personal data and flogging it on to the highest bidder.



Remember obesity is absolutely nothing at all to do with cheap supersized meals, cheep booze, sedentary lifestyles, lack of aspiration, poverty, being made to feel like dirt and told all your dreams need to be purchased and paid for on credit - a 4x4, flat-screened, double-glazed, upgraded, index-linked lifestyle! Our phone-ins, small-add lonely hearts, lottery fixated, overpriced care homes, privatised sports centres, comfort eating, disconnected, too thin-too fat obsessed tabloids, page 3 ‘girls’ side by side with anorexics, booze guzzling, armchair-phone-voting-TV-addicted, technologically deluded spoon-fed nanny-state-sponsored prescriptions, market-driven consumer lifestyle, has no part whatsoever in this ‘obesity epidemic’ - honestly.

Oh, and I understand that dear old MacDonald's has started an oh-so-needed delivery service for those of us so unable to leave our armchairs, and they'll bring super-sized slops straight to us. Hey, one day they may purĂ©e it and provide us with our very own clown-carer to spoon feed us to. 

Obviously, this is a serious issue and innovations like the micro-chip are potentially groundbreaking, but continuing to pathologise ‘diseases’ that are socially influenced, divorces us from personal choice and the consequences of our actions and our glib dependence on mopping up after the event. What about the governments ‘nudge unit’ that I understand has been part privatised! Where’s the evidence of the Behavioural Insights Team on affecting systemic lifestyle change? Obesity is a public health issue and a political issue.


Tracking study reveals public interest in the arts
A slightly higher proportion of UK adults have an interest in arts and culture (87%) than have an interest in sports (84%), according to the latest research into attitudes to the arts, although there are significant differences between men and women, with sports interest biased towards men, and arts and culture skewed towards women. Among young adults, almost as many think of themselves as an ‘arty person’ (49%) as a ‘sporty person’ (51%), and whilst only a quarter of all adults rate their general knowledge of arts and culture ‘much better’ or ‘a bit better’ than most, this figure is much higher (36%) among 16 to 29 year olds. The under-45s are also far more likely than those aged 45 and over to agree that arts and culture are important in helping them to understand the world around them. Find out more at:


Youth Arts and Health Conference
Rochdale Youth Service are looking to hold a Youth Arts and Health Conference in early March 2015. They are looking to develop a programme of young people’s health related projects, including a visual arts exhibition and a showcase of dance, drama and music. With interactive young people’s workshops and a series of speakers who could talk to professionals and young people on related themes, they are very interested to hear from anyone who might like to contribute to this conference. Please email Vicky Lomax at Rochdale Borough Council vicky.lomax@rochdale.gov.uk

Conrad Botes. Secret Language II. 2005. Lithograph, composition: 17 11/16 x 14 15/16" (45 x 38 cm). Publisher and printer: The Artists’ Press, White River, South Africa Edition: 30. The Museum of Modern Art. General Print Fund. © 2011 Conrad Botes
From our own correspondent... 
More from Victoria Hume in South Africa.
"...communities and patients seem far more open to arts as a tool for allowing their voice to be heard, allowing them to become empowered."

Granada Foundation Grants Programme 
(North West England)
The Granada Foundation has announced that the next closing date for applications is the 24th September 2014. Through its grants programme, the Foundation wishes to encourage and promote the study, practice and appreciation of the fine arts, including drawing, architecture and landscape architecture, sculpture, literature, music, opera, drama, cinema, and the methods and means of their dissemination. The Foundation also welcomes applications which aim to engage and inspire young people and adults to take an interest in science. The Advisory Council meets three times a year at regular intervals to consider applications. There is a clear preference for new projects; although the Foundation will support festivals and other annual events, this should not be regarded as automatically renewable. Prospective applicants are advised, in the first instance, to provide a brief outline of the project for which funding is sought by completing a short enquiry form or by telephoning the Administrator for an informal discussion, on 01244 661867. Read more at: http://www.granadafoundation.org/howtoapply/tabid/80/Default.aspx 

Digital Projects with a Social Impact
Next grant deadline: 22 September 2014
The Nominet Trust which provides funding and support to imaginative social technology ventures has announced that the next funding round of its Social Tech Seed Investment Programme will open for applications on the 22 September 2014. Social Tech Seed is an investment programme that offers early-stage investment of between £15,000 and £50,000 to entrepreneurs who are looking to develop new ventures using digital for social impact. This programme provides funding and support to help entrepreneurs nurture, develop and test their ideas. The Trust is looking for applications that demonstrate the potential of technology to tackle some of the big social issues in sectors including education, employability, healthcare and the environment.The Trust are hosting a series of pre-application events and web chats to give potential applicants the opportunity to find out more about what the Trust are looking for in a social tech venture and ask any questions about their project. Read more at www.nominettrust.org.uk/how-to-apply/our-investment-programmes-0 

Dementia Hub Project Manager 
(West Cornwall)
The essential requirements for the job are:
  • Knowledge and experience of cutting edge practice in person centred dementia support
  • Knowledge and experience of the role of participatory Arts in enhancing quality of life and wellbeing
  • Knowledge and experience of support work
  • Capacity to self direct, research and build supportive connections between formative evidence based learning and service improvement
  • Experience at working in partnership with multiple agencies and stakeholders.  http://m.monster.co.uk/138858875 

Saturday, 6 September 2014

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Arts for Health are about to embark on an exploration of the impact of arts interventions on the mental health and wellbeing of nursing and care staff in the UK and further afield. We would be interested to read any papers, academic or journalistic in style, or have a brief outline of your work in this field. We are particularly keen to hear about the efficacy of measurement tools like WEMWBS. Just email artsforhealth@aol.com Thank you. 



The Bland Middle-Ground of Arts and Health...
A few years ago I posted this short clip of the actress Queenie Watts imposing something of her characters personality on the day-to-day tedium of a residential care-home. I share it again, not just because it makes me smile, but because as well as the Dementia and Imagination project that I have the pleasure of working on, it seems that at every corner I turn, people are scrabbling around to create the worlds greatest arts project with people affected by memory loss. Every conceivable art form is being sold as the next great breakthrough in dementia care - quite often bland and poorly conceived - driven by well intentioned, but deluded self-belief. 

Although I work in the field of arts/health, I have a dark fear about the wholesale reduction of culture and the arts to some bland wellbeing formula for older people. Isn’t it obvious that access to the arts will have a profound impact on people? But isn’t it even more blindingly obvious that lots of people don’t access the arts because they don’t think it’s relevant - can’t afford it - haven’t experienced it - or it’s not something offered in their postcode? (well, perhaps some nanny-state-sponsored Legz Akimbo might be). This week I saw the blistering Helen McCrory as Medea*. Sitting not too far from me, was a woman I know to have dementia. It was thrilling to see her absorbed and moved by this violent and deeply harrowing tragedy. A dangerous theatre visit for someone affected by dementia perhaps? I think not. Let us up the ante in our creative thinking.


I’ve spent too many hours in care homes, hospitals and other waiting rooms to know that the most isolated older people would probably enjoy a bit of decent company and conversation more than anything else. We’ve got ourselves in a bad way, when we’re forced to house our elders in overcrowded terminal transit depots, whilst we work all hours possible to line the pockets of owners, who pay their underpaid, uninspired bank-staff to sing prescription songs of bygone days, to the rheumy-eyed depressives, who we’ll all ultimately replace. We should be concerned - deeply concerned. Well, Queenie does it for me every time. It’s that determined look in her eyes, the defiant hammering of a sub-standard piano, the self determination and just a little bit of frustrated rage at this sub-standard experience of living. Forget worrying about purgatory in the 'after life', it's here on earth and just around the corner.


The Art of the Phone Booth in Remote Northern Territory
Anyone over the age of 20 may just remember the tail-end of a time, when to talk to friends and lovers, (beyond the prying ears of the family) we were dependent on phoneboxes on street corners. Foul piss-smelling places, scrawled with scratched-out names and numbers and more often than not, non too sophisticated renditions of genitalia. Bob Gosforth has written a neat little article on the phone booths in the remote Northern Territory of Australia, which reflects on these last out-posts for people who need to communicate from the middle of vast empty spaces, but who might not have credit or can’t afford, or access a mobile. Click on the image below to read the article.


The Chandelier of Lost Earrings... 
...has been named as the winner in the Best Arts Project category of the 2014 National Lottery Awards, following a public vote. Made from more than 3,000 single earrings, donated by people who have lost the other half of the pair, the sculpture is 2.5 metres tall and was first exhibited in the courtyard of St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester before going on to tour the country. Big congratulations to Lauren and Sharon and click on the image below for more info.


Austin & Hope Pilkington Trust
The Austin and Hope Pilkington Trust which awards grants to registered charities in the United Kingdom has announced that the next closing date for applications is 1 November 2014. During 2014, the Trust is seeking to fund projects that promote Music and the Arts and help the elderly. Grants are usually between £1,000 and £3,000 and are awarded for one year. Read more at: http://www.austin-hope-pilkington.org.uk/

Interactive Health Care Fund Opens for Applications 
Creative England has announced a new £1million fund for regional based Small and medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), designed to stimulate creative and digital innovation in UK healthcare. The fund aims to encourage small creative and digital businesses in the North, Midlands and South West regions to develop innovative concepts or prototypes using digital technology to improve patient care and health services. The first of four programmes to open as part of this fund is the West Midlands Interactive Healthcare Fund. This is a £250,000 fund that will offer five £50,000 investments to support projects that focus on:
Improving quality of care
Caring for people with dementia
Supporting people with long-term conditions
Data visualisation.
Applications will be assessed on a rolling basis and the fund will close on 31 October 2014. Read more at http://www.creativeengland.co.uk/business/interactive-healthcare-fund

Media Therapy Developer
An exciting opportunity has become available for a motivated media graduate to apply theirproduction and project management skills and expertise in a unique environment. The post has been created as a result of an innovative Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) project, The Nottinghamshire healthcare NHS Trust and The Lincoln School of Film and Media at the University of Lincoln. The successful candidate will be based at The Peaks Unit which is located within the high secure Rampton Hospital. The Peaks is a centre for the treatment of men with severe personality disorder and the project will form part of the unit’s “Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT)”. 

The project aims to design and produce a system for patients to create interactive drama and then disseminate that drama to others within the hospital via the units secure media system. There will also be the expectation that the associate will work with clinicians and academics to produce a system for measuring patient engagement with the process and products. http://jobs.lincoln.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=EL1101



*Medea, written in 431BC by Euripides. Even though I didn’t want to think any more about what psychosis might, or might not be, this play provokes a deep questioning of what constitutes ‘insanity’ in the face of abuse by the individual and by society. Bloody brilliant. 

Sunday, 31 August 2014

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Great to see the work of Sarah Corbett and the Craftivists Collective thriving. Here’s her latest posting on the #wellMAKING Crafitivist Garden. I particularly like her update on the 5-Ways to Wellbeing!

Craft. Connect. Reflect. Challenge. Grow. 


Calling all Guerrilla Artists
Following the huge success of our first Guerrilla Arts Workshop in July, Alternative Futures Group are now inviting artist submissions for their 2014/15 Guerrilla Arts Project. - See more by clicking on the poster below.


The Trusthouse Charitable Foundation
The Trusthouse Charitable Foundation has announced that capital and revenue funding is available to support the work of local and national charities and not-for-profit organisations that address rural and urban deprivation. Within these two main headings, the Trust is interested in helping established projects which work in the fields of:
•  Community Support
•  Arts, Education & Heritage
•  Disability & Health Care
The type of projects the Trust are interested in funding include projects providing transport for the elderly, disabled or disadvantaged; contact networks for the young disabled; projects which encourage a sense of community such as community centres and village halls; employment training schemes especially those promoting local, traditional crafts; projects addressing issues such as drug/alcohol misuse or homelessness.

The Grants Committee meets quarterly to consider applications at the beginning of February, May, September and November. The deadlines for submitting applications are generally 2 months before the date of a meeting. Read more at: http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk/ 


Comic Relief
Comic Relief's grant making programme has moved away from funding in specialist areas, to supporting a wider range of work that meets with one of its four themes:
  • Safer Lives 
  • Better Futures 
  • Healthier Finances 
  • Fairer Society 

Comic Relief will make grants for up to 3 years, for a minimum of £10,000.   There is no maximum grant size, however an average grant size is for £130,000 over three years.  Comic Relief will consider applications for core costs from organisations where the entire work of the organisation fits strongly with the theme.  All applications must also fit with one of Comic Relief's priorities. For further information click on the beautiful Robert Walser quote above. 
(thanks Mark P for the image)


A sparse blog this week - swamped and slightly disconnected. Big fat blackberries picked from hedgerows and scratched purple hands as a distraction from all that lies ahead. The green, green fields and trees somehow overbearing.

Tuesday, 26 August 2014

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From Urban Psychosis to Urban Death
Last Wednesday I was thrilled to welcome Professors John Read and Rhiannon Corcoran to the Holden Gallery, who at the invitation of my colleague Dr Kat Taylor, gave two quite remarkable presentations to coincide with the final days of the Holden Gallery exhibition, Urban Psychosis.


The Psychosis in Context event brought together people with experience of the ‘mental health system’ alongside psychologists, artists and interested others, and both speakers shared a passion for understanding the rich texture of the human condition. Whilst Rhiannon focused on a very real and unfolding research project, the Prosocial Place Project*, John gave a sweeping critique of the systems in place that label people, and the ways in which the prevailing model of psychiatry is focused on narrow biological factors, regardless of the lack of statistical significance in the evidence base.      

“For every British psychiatrist who thinks schizophrenia is caused primarily by social factors there are 115 who think it is caused primarily by biological factors.”

Focusing on the impact of adverse life experiences on our mental health, John questioned the motives of both biological psychiatrists and the pharmaceutical industry. He vociferously challenged the ‘evidence’ that schizophrenia is a’brain disease’ 

His presentation was entitled - Can Poverty Help Drive You Mad? - and the answer was an unequivocal yes! 30 years ago the relationship between ‘schizophrenia’ and poverty was described as ‘one of the most consistent findings in the field of psychiatric epidemiology’ (Eaton, 1980). 


Focusing on the impact of ethnicity, race and negative childhood experiences, he stressed that ‘deprived children are four times more likely to develop ‘non-schizophrenic psychotic illness’ but eight times more likely to grow-up to be ‘schizophrenic’ (Harrison, Gunnell, Glazebrook, Page, & Kwiecinski, 2001). Even among children with no family history of psychosis the deprived children were seven times more likely to develop ‘schizophrenia’,

Above all, John suggested that the redistribution of social power, the rejection of prejudice and bigotry and increased social justice, are central to public mental health. 

It was an inspiring evening that provoked debate and beautifully echoed the themes of the exhibition. My thanks to everyone who contributed

*I recommend this little film that shows how a simple intervention to disrupt our regulated lifestyles and introduce uncertainty, is liberating, unifying and ultimately very practical. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vzDDMzq7d0 


URBAN DEATH PROJECT
Because death is momentous, miraculous, and mysterious
Because the cycles of nature help us grieve and heal
Because our bodies are full of life-giving potential
We propose a new option for laying our loved ones to rest.

Although I don’t know the people who are developing this work, I have to share this website with you. It would be interesting to know what you think.

‘The Urban Death Project is a compost-based renewal system. At the heart of the project is a three-story core, within which bodies and high-carbon materials are placed. Over the span of a few months, with the help of aerobic decomposition and microbial activity, the bodies decompose fully, leaving a rich compost. The Urban Death Project is not simply a system for turning our bodies into soil-building material. It is also a space for the contemplation of our place in the natural world, and a ritual to help us say goodbye to our loved ones by connecting us with the cycles of nature.’  

You can find out more about this vision and its instigator Katrina Spade, by clicking on the image above. 


Lord Richard Attenborough
This weekend Lord Attenborough died aged 90. The actor, director and film-maker has been a good friend to Arts for Health and for many years was its patron. In 1999 he gave the opening adress to the first world symposium on arts and health (CHARTS), here at MMU and set the course on this rapidly expanding agenda. 

‘The arts in all their glorious manifestations are essential prescriptions for all those who are in pain, despair or in recovery. Creativity and imagination stimulate the spirit and, in so doing, speed the healing process. They are a powerful medicine indeed.’ 
Lord Attenborough; Culture, Health and the Arts, World Symposium at MMU


Lost is Found Theory
Friend of Arts for Health and artist on the I AM project, Leon Jakeman has work on exhibition at The Brink in Liverpool. Click on the image above for more information.


Take the Critical Spaces Survey - A Critical Catalyst for Socially-Engaged Art
Critical Spaces is a new and FREE web-based platform for socially-engaged artists, launching in Autumn 2014. It has been designed by artists, for artists.

17 workshops have been held across the UK to research and develop this platform. This survey is your opportunity to support the fine-tuning of Critical Spaces. You will also be given the opportunity to pre-register for the beta launch.

Critical Spaces will:

  • Increase artist visibility - by featuring a UK map and directory of artists.
  • Facilitate new artist connections - by allowing you to search for artists, both geographically and by practice.
  • Support critical thinking - through advocacy, resources and arranging ‘Critical Gatherings’.
To complete the survey click 'Take the Survey' or copy and paste the following web-address into your browser: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/criticalspaces
The success of Critical Spaces relies on your support - please share this survey with other socially-engaged artists. The survey will close on Friday 19th September 2014. Critical Spaces is an initiative by Hannah Hull in partnership wih ixia public art think tank.


Funding for Projects that Address Urban & Rural Deprivation 
The Trusthouse Charitable Foundation has announced that capital and revenue funding is available to support the work of local and national charities and not-for-profit organisations that address rural and urban deprivation. Within these two main headings, the Trust is interested in helping established projects which work in the fields of:
  • Community SupportArts, 
  • Education & Heritage
  • Disability & Health Care. 
The type of projects the Trust are interested in funding include projects providing transport for the elderly, disabled or disadvantaged; contact networks for the young disabled; projects which encourage a sense of community such as community centres and village halls; employment training schemes especially those promoting local, traditional crafts; projects addressing issues such as drug/alcohol misuse or homelessness.

The Foundation also provides funding to support capital projects at hospices throughout the UK; and on local projects providing support for mothers and babies in the first two years of life. The Grants Committee meets quarterly to consider applications at the beginning of February, May, September and November. The deadlines for submitting applications are generally 2 months before the date of a meeting. Read more at http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk/



Today is the singer Shirley Mansons birthday, as it would be Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, if she were still alive. Better known as the Nobel Prize winning nun, Mother Teresa, Agnes had some pretty queer ideas, best summed up by Christopher Hitchens:

“Mother Teresa was not a friend of the poor. She was a friend of poverty. She said that suffering was a gift from God. She spent her life opposing the only known cure for poverty, which is the empowerment of women and the emancipation of them from a livestock version of compulsory reproduction.” 


Saturday, 16 August 2014

Science + Culture = Beautiful Chaos

PSYCHOSIS IN CONTEXT
An Urban Psychosis event
Holden Gallery
20 August 6 - 8pm

The North West Arts and Health Network and Liverpool Psychosis Research Group, Institute of Psychology Health and Society, University of Liverpool presents: 



CAN POVERTY HELP DRIVE YOU MAD?
Professor John Read will summarise the research showing that, contrary to the prevailing ‘wisdom’ that psychosis is a genetically based ‘brain disorder’, poverty - and relative poverty - are powerful predictors of who ends up experiencing psychosis and being diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia’. Professor Rhiannon Corocoran will share initial research from the THE PROSOCIAL PLACE PROGRAMME exploring the relationship of the urban environment to mental health and wellbeing.

After working for nearly 20 years as a Clinical Psychologist and manager of mental health services in the UK and the USA, Professor John Read joined the University of Auckland, New Zealand. There he published over 100 papers in research journals, primarily on the relationship between adverse life events and psychosis. He also researches the negative effects of bio-genetic causal explanations on prejudice, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in mental health. John is on the Executive Committee of the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis www.isps.org and editor of the ISPS’s scientific journal ‘Psychosis’. In May 2013, John took up the post of Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool.

There are very limited tickets available for this free event:



THE RACE FOR THE PRIZE
As scientists race for the ultimate publicity prize - a vaccine for ebola - it’s interesting to see that squeaky-clean GSK are up-front in the race - or at least - being up front! 

“Meeting this goal will place an unprecedented timeframe on GlaxoSmithKline, the drug maker which runs the research programme in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health. The WHO has acknowledged that there is not enough time for the vaccine to undergo the standard, years-long clinical trials process, but has concluded that in this case it would be ethical to make it widely available with much less testing.”

With the WHO declaring the outbreak an international public health emergency,  it reminds me that a whole raft of viruses are out there, conveniently ignored whilst they are at arms length, in some far-off country. Whilst we live side-by-side with animals, farm them in terrible conditions, live in abject poverty on one hand, and travel the globe on the other, the Corona, Hendra, Ebola and the predicted and much feared mutation of H5N1, H7N9 (avian flu) and H1N1 (swine flu) will inevitably travel too. The book Spillover by David Quammen provides unsensational and essential reading around our relationship with animals and the inevitable zoonosis. 

Whilst the president of Liberia has very practically called for three days of prayer and fasting, as “the ultimate solution” to the Ebola virus, apparently a couple of boxes of the experimental drug ZMapp (not a GSK product) are winging their way to Africa, as I type. That in itself is interesting, as it’s already been given to Americans and a European, but not yet to Africans. Is that a continuation of colonialism, or perhaps a fear of ‘using’ African people as guinea pigs? Hmm, that doesn’t seem to have previously stopped big pharma exploiting large numbers of chemically-clean communities in developing countries as virgin-lab-rats.

Working with the Asia Europe Foundation on their Accurate Scenarios, Active Planning pandemic preparedness, public health project, has been hugely beneficial to me, but I will be curious to see how relevant and useful this foresight work has been, in the current situation. I recently watched the TV series UTOPIA which, far-fetched though it seemed, ran a storyline of government, big-pharma, conspiracy, eugenics and virus manipulation. It was equally potty, violent and compelling. Hoorah for popular culture, but somehow the current crisis in Africa and our incorruptible pharmaceutical industry have been conjoined in my mind - I feel a little unrest.


MEDICINE UNBOXED: FRONTIERS
We will explore the fact of human life and consciousness within a wider universe; our shared human matter and frailty; the flesh and margins of our bodies and minds; the sea and the land; the migrant, outsider and underprivileged; the lines that separate life from death; the development and grounds for moral thought; the separation between suffering and illness; the interface between the individual and society and the frontier between imagination and fact in our understanding of humanity, illness and medicine. Click on the image below for more info.



Funding for Digital Projects with a Social Impact 
The Nominet Trust which provides funding and support to imaginative social technology ventures has announced that the next funding round of its Social Tech Seed Investment Programme will open for applications in September 2014. Social Tech Seed is an investment programme that offers early-stage investment of between £15,000 and £50,000 to entrepreneurs who are looking to develop new ventures using digital for social impact. This programme provides funding and support to help entrepreneurs nurture, develop and test their ideas. The Trust is looking for applications that demonstrate the potential of technology to tackle some of the big social issues in sectors including education, employability, healthcare and the environment. Click on the full face swimming mask for more info.